Ruger 10/22 Bolt Upgrade from Faxon Firearms

Ruger 10/22 bolt

There are many parts that make up a 10/22 rifle, and each one of them plays an important role. However, the most critical component of the Ruger is the bolt.

The trigger may be what initiates every shot, but it’s the bolt that’s responsible for the shot-to-shot operation.

A high-quality bolt affects more than just reliability. The bolt face, its consistency, and how the firing pin strikes the bullet significantly contribute to the rifle’s accuracy.

Faxon Stainless Steel Bolt Assembly for 10/22

Whether you’re building up a new gun or keeping an old favorite running, the Faxon 10/22 Bolt Assembly is the best choice.

Ruger 1022 Bolt

Compatible with the OEM receiver, trigger group, charging handle, and bolt stop pin, the Faxon 10/22 bolt is fully assembled and ready to drop into your Ruger 10/22.

Specs

  • Material: 17-4 PH Stainless steel, H900
  • Hardness: HRC 40 – 47
  • Round Firing Pin
  • Sharp Extractor

Why Upgrade a 10/22 Bolt?

Upgrading the bolt improves reliability and accuracy on any 10/22 rifle.

A high-quality bolt such as the one from Faxon Firearms is properly radiused and polished to enhance the reliability of the cyclic action.

Ruger 1022 Bolt

Additionally, the Faxon 10/22 bolt has the proper head spacing in order to improve the reliability of the bullets feeding from the magazine into the chamber.

Lastly, proper firing pin protrusion ensures optimal striking of the rimfire case.

Ruger 1022 Bolt

For these reasons, upgrading your 10/22 bolt does have its advantages. 

All these small gains add up to overall reliability, consistent performance, and improved accuracy.

Does The Ruger 10/22 Have a Bolt Hold Open?

Out of the box in the stock configuration, the Ruger 10/22 does not have a last-round bolt hold open feature.

Ruger 1022 Bolt

To add the bolt hold open feature, you need a third-party upgrade such as the CST Auto Bolt Stop.

What is a 10/22 Bolt Buffer?

A bolt buffer replaces/upgrades the bolt stop pin in your 10/22 receiver. The OEM bolt stop pin is made from steel, whereas the bolt buffer is made from a polymer material.

Over time the steel bolt stop pin can cause micro-cracks in the receiver due to repeated impacts of the bolt during shooting. The bolt buffer mitigates that and several other issues by being manufactured out of a polymer material.

There are three main benefits of replacing the bolt stop pin with a bolt buffer.

  1. It reduces the sound when the bolt slams rearward during the cycling action during shooting. This is also a benefit when shooting suppressed as it greatly reduces the noise signature even more.
  2. The 10/22 blowback action is less shaky because of the dampening of the recoil and bolt cycling vibrations.
  3. It can prevent cracks in the 10/22 receiver resulting from prolonged usage, high round count shooting, or the added stress of high-velocity ammo.

The Ruger 10/22 bolt by Faxon includes a bolt buffer to replace the OEM bolt stop pin. If you’re interested in learning more, check out more on the Ruger 10/22 Bolt here.

Faxon’s FX19 Glock 19 Complete Kit

Faxon FX19 Patriot and Hellfire pistols laying on a table

The Polymer 80 kits have become so popular that they are usually out of stock everywhere. However, it’s a great way to custom-build your variant of a Glock 19.

Although you may learn a lot by building your gun, some may want the advantages of a Polymer 80 kit but don’t want to hassle with learning how to do it or taking the time to do it.

FX19 Hellfire pistol in front of a turkey and flowers
Faxon FX19 Hellfire

Faxon Firearms has remedied that issue by offering a complete PF940C kit known as the FX19. The Faxon FX19 comes in two different variants; The FX19 Patriot and its big brother, the FX19 Hellfire.

The Faxon FX19 pistols are more or less a Polymer 80 PF940C complete kit, without being a Glock 19, but are compatible with all Glock 19 parts and accessories.

PF940C In Stock | Faxon FX19

Faxon took the PF940C gun frame and gave it a 1911 grip angle and improved texture. In addition to that, they polished the front & rear slide rails.

Patriot complete kit laying on a table
Faxon Patriot Pistol

They may be minor differences, but they are noticeable when holding the gun in your hand.

They dropped in an Overwatch Precision Trigger to finish the custom frame.

The Faxon Patriot FX19

The Faxon Patriot was made for concealed carry. Everything from the grip to the trigger and sights make for a formidable CCW firearm.

What stands out the most is the custom-cut slide with serrations in all the right places for manipulating the gun and doing press checks.

 Patriot product photo
FX19 Patriot

The top of the slide has been cut for a Trijicon RMR or Holosun 507C. The front sight is a bright red fiber optic with a blacked-out rear site, making it extremely quick and easy to locate.

On top of all that, the Patriot comes with a match-grade barrel made in-house by Faxon, and lastly, the Patriot ships with a 15-round Glock OEM magazine.

The Faxon Hellfire FX19

The big brother to the Faxon Patriot is the Faxon Hellfire FX19

After handling the Patriot, the Hellfire was quite a different experience. The Hellfire feels made for my hand.

The Hellfire utilizes the same frame as the Patriot, with the exception of a magwell. The magwell alone makes a noticeable difference in the grip. However, because of the magwell and the undercut trigger guard, you can get the highest grip possible on the gun.

Faxon Hellfire product photo
Faxon Hellfire

The sights used on the Hellfire are suppressor-height sights from Night Fision. In addition, the front sight contains a Tritium insert that ALWAYS glows, and the rear sight is blacked-out. This combination makes for fast target acquisition.

The custom-cut slide, threaded barrel, Night Fision suppressor height sights, and extended 20-round magazine w/magwell may remind you of something from a John Wick movie.

PF940C vs PF940v2

The PF940C frame is considered a compact size, I.E., Glock 19, while the Polymer 80 PF940v2 build is regarded as a full-sized frame, I.E., Glock 17.

 Patriot comparison to another Glock model
Bottom: Patriot Complete Kit

The best thing about the full-frame PF940V2 is the compatibility with 9mm, .40 S&W, and .357 Sig pistols.

What Gen Glock is the PF940C?

The PF940C is explicitly made for the Glock 19/23 Gen 3 pistol frame, magazine, and barrel.
What is PF940C compatible with?

The PF940C offers compatibility with Glock 19 Gen 3 components. In addition, the PF940C frame comes with an aggressive texture that emulates a stippled pattern.

Features like the extended beaver tail, a double undercut trigger guard, and a thumb ledge enhance the ergonomics allowing for an adequate grip and improved recoil control.

Best Pistol Compensator for CCW?

Best Pistol Compensator for CCW?

There’s been a resurgence in pistol compensators this year as a few manufacturers have come out with options for various handgun models. Are comps worth the hype, especially for concealed carry?

Faxon Firearms says, “Anything improving pistol accuracy is worth checking out.”

That said, let’s take a look at the Faxon Firearms EXOS.

From the Faxon release.

Faxon EXOS | Is It The Best Pistol Compensator?

Constructed of black anodized 6061 Aluminum, the Faxon EXOS features an angled front port single chamber design, enabling the compensator to improve shot-to-shot accuracy by reducing muzzle climb and recoil.

Watch the video, see what you think. 

The EXOS’ specially designed port design allows gas to deflect upwards as opposed to only deflecting to the sides, reducing the up-and-down muzzle movement and allowing your sights to reset on target much faster.

The Faxon EXOS Pistol Compensator is designed to fit flush with the slide and has been optimized for Faxon match-grade pistol barrels. For all other threaded pistol barrels, the barrel should protrude .600″ or less for a flush fit.

Compatible Hosts For The Faxon EXOS Pistol Comp

  • All Glock Gen 5 Pistols
  • Glock 19/17/34 Gen 4Glock 19/17/34 Gen 3
  • Glock 43/43x
  • Glock 48
  • SIG P365/P365XL
  • SIG P320
  • M&P Shield/Shield Plus
  • M&P Full Size Pistols
  • Faxon FX19 Pistols

Each EXOS pistol compensator comes complete with thread locker, two 6-32 set screws, and a 1/16 Allen wrench. 

Faxon EXOS pistol compensator.

Best Pistol Compensator (Including For Concealed Carry)

If you want to add a compensator to your concealed carry pistol, the Faxon EXOS Comp is a great choice. 

Concealed carry holsters are often not too forgiving when it comes to pistol compensators. The EXOS Comp addresses these issues with its low-profile design that mimics the profile of the pistol’s slide.

The EXOS will work with any open-ended holster designed for your pistol. Even IWB holsters can work comfortably with this compensator.

Conclusion

We’re confident you’ll agree the Faxon EXOS is one of the best pistol compensators to hit the market. 

Granted it’s not the only player in town, but its unique port design, ease of installation, and performance have put the competition on its heels.

Learn more at www.faxonfirearms.com

West Coast Armor | Chest Plates For All

West Coast Armor Promotional Picture

Body Armor used to be cumbersome and expensive, good thing it ain’t 2005 anymore. Happily, West Coast Armor has stepped up to the plate (no pun intended) with its Pure Dyneema and Pure Spectra plates.

In fact, the team at West Coast Armor spent five years on R&D before releasing their first product. They’re not messing around when it comes to the preservation of life.

Who Is West Coast Armor?

Person pulling west coast armor out of their vest
West Coast Chest Plate

The diverse team at West Coast Armor has deep roots in the world of executive protection, military, law enforcement, and the private sector. In addition, the team at West Coast Armor has used and created body armor throughout their individual careers. They know firsthand the benefits and drawbacks of the different types of body armor.

With this knowledge and real-world experience, they achieved what they set out to do. West Coast Armor put five years of research and development, so they could create their industry-leading body armor. They were rewarded with Armor that is lighter, stronger, and more affordable than any others on the market.

What Sets Apart West Coast Armor?

West Coast Armor uses Pure Dyneema or Pure next-gen Spectra in the construction of its body armor plates.

Hard armor made with pure Dyneema and next-gen Spectra is up to 75% lighter than steel or other traditional armor materials. This is without compromising the level of protection traditional materials provide.

For military, law enforcement, and others working in high-risk environments, hard armor made from Dyneema provides not only maximum protection but also enhances the comfort, maneuverability, and efficiency of the person wearing it.

Body armor and weapons at an outdoor range
Body Armor put to the test

5 Benefits of Using Dyneema in Body Armor Plates

  1. Constructed from ceramics, compressed laminate sheets, metallic plates, or composites
  2. Designed to deform and capture the bullet upon impact
  3. Absorbs and distributes the kinetic energy of the impact
  4. Protects against NIJ Level III, III+ and works as an excellent backing for ceramics in III++ or IV rifle threats
  5. 75% lighter than steel and 25% lighter than Aramid

Where are West Coast Armor Plates Made?

All raw materials are 100% domestically sourced and made in the USA.

Is West Coast Armor NIJ Certified?

West coast armor and gear sitting against a wall

Yes. West Coast Armor is NIJ certified, and all their body armor plates meet or exceed NIJ criteria.

The NIJ conducts independent research on the Ballistic Resistance of Body Armor with the help of the Office of Law Enforcement Standards (OLES). The most important attribute of the NIJ is its ability to remain objective to the industry and only adopt criteria based on scientific research and testing.

This research and testing are designed to save lives and improve the level of justice our law enforcement agencies can provide. This is why every company that wishes to sell body armor in the United States must meet the requirements set forth by the NIJ.

If you’re looking for a company that is selling armor, ensure they can provide an NIJ letter of compliance by doing a simple check on DOJ’s website to see if the company is certified.

West Coast Armor Hard Armor Levels

Patriot Armor IIIa Plate

Patriot Armor IIIa Plate
Patriot Armor IIIa Plate

The Patriot Armor level 3a body armor Plate is so unbelievably light and thin that you will forget you’re wearing it. At 0.82 pounds per square foot, these lightweights perform like heavyweights.

Forged from a proprietary manufacturing process, the IIIA Plate is constructed with some of the strongest and lightest ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers available.

West Coast Armor’s UHMWPE fibers are stronger than steel at a fraction of the weight.

Features and Specs

  • Designed for use as a standalone plate
  • Standalone NIJ threat level of IIIA
  • True multi-shot plate
  • Weatherproofing: spray-lined synthetic coating
  • 0.82 pounds per square foot
  • Available in black polyurea spray lining
  • Size: 10″ x 12″

Patriot Armor IIIP Plate

Patriot Armor IIIP Plate
Patriot Armor IIIP Plate

The performance of our Patriot Armor IIIP Plates is second to none. At an incredible 3.3 pounds per square foot, they are clearly some of the strongest level 3 body armor plates available today.

Forged from a proprietary manufacturing process, the IIIP Plate is constructed with some of the strongest and lightest ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers available.

West Coast Armor’s UHMWPE fibers are stronger than steel at a fraction of the weight.

Features and Specs

  • Standalone NIJ threat level of III
  • True multi-shot plate
  • 3.3 pounds per square foot
  • Sizes 10×12″, 11×14″

Level IV AP Plate

West Coast Armor’s IV AP Plate is just like its little brother, the IIIP Plate, in that it is unbelievably strong and light. Weighing 5.5 pounds per square foot, it takes the performance of your tactical armor to a higher level.

Their proprietary manufacturing process utilizes some of the strongest and lightest ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers available, allowing West Coast Armor to forge the strongest lightweight body armor on the market today.

Features and Specs

  • Ceramic strike face and UHMWPE backing
  • Finished with a spray-lined, weatherproof synthetic coating
  • 5.5 pounds per square foot
  • Available in black
  • Size: 10″x12″
  • Multi curve

West Coast Armor Testimonies

person pulling a chest plate from their vest

“As a former Police Chief, I believe that one of the most important responsibilities we have is to give the men and women that serve our profession the best equipment to do their job and keep them safe. I’ve seen firsthand the superior quality of the West Coast Armor Body armor in action. I’ve been blessed to witness agencies across the country test West Coast Armor vests and plates, and the outcomes were superior. I recommend to all my colleagues that they reach out to West Coast Armor.” – Donald (Chief of Police Ret.)

“The West Coast Armor level 4 plates are the most well-balanced and comfortable plates I’ve used. After seven combat deployments between Special Operations and Contract work, I can only wish I’d had these issued to me. I have full trust and confidence in their ballistic properties as I’ve seen their performance through more rigorous testing than NIJ requires. These plates have my full endorsement.” – Kyle C.

“As a retired police officer of 23 years working long shifts and jobs from the jail to vice then on to detective. I was always issued uncomfortable, heavy stiff armor. After wearing all types of armor throughout my military and law enforcement carrier, I can say I’ve never seen anything like it. Without question, West Coast Armor makes me want to wear armor again; it’s the lightest, thinnest and strongest armor I’ve ever seen.” – Bob V. Esponisa

West Coast Armor sitting in a bag

Nightstick SFL – An Excellent Shotgun Forend Light Option

Nightstick SFL – An Excellent Shotgun Forend Light Option

Mounting lights on pump-action shotguns is a real hassle. Working the pump back and forth makes most lights and remote switches tricky to use without proper planning. In the past, the best options always seemed to come from Surefire in the form of replacing the pump with a dedicated light. Now that’s it’s 2022, Surefire has competitors, and one that came out of nowhere was the Nightstick SFL or Shotgun Forend Light.

This particular Nightstick WML isn’t completely out of nowhere. I first saw it at SHOT and was fairly impressed. The fine folks at Nightstick gave me a card and promised to send one when available. They made good on that promise, and my Mossberg 590 now wears a Nightstick SFL. I’ve been kicking it around for a little over a month now, and I’ve got the full run down.

Before we dive in, let’s cover the logistics. The Nightstick SFL works with the Mossberg 500/590/Maverick 88 series and the Remington 870 series. Benelli fans like me are left out to dry, but the two biggest shotguns in North America are covered. The 590 model comes equipped to function on both the short and long tube, so it will fit on the Shockwave versions. On full-sized Mossberg shotguns, you’ll use the equipped spacer.

Mossberg variant close up.
The Mossberg variant comes ready for the Shockwave and full-sized fighting shotguns.

Installation took no time, and Nightstick includes the batteries, the tube wrench, and an optional strap. It’s all in one package that makes everything quick and easy to install.

Nightstick Shotgun Forend Light: Specifications

The Nightstick Shotgun Forend Light (SFL) comes with not just a light but a laser as well. Visible laser might serve a dubious nature in the age of red dots, but on a pistol grip firearm like the Shockwave, they make close range aiming easy and a ton of fun. We’ll talk about that a little later. Let’s look at the specifications of this thing.

dThe SFL is rather large and in charge.Lumens – 1200
Candela – 10,315
Length – 7.1 inches
Weight – 17.5 ounces
Width – 2 inches
Drop Rating – 2 meters
Waterproof Rating – IPX7

Specs-wise it’s fairly impressive. 1,200 lumens is a fair bit of light, and a 10,315 candela isn’t too bad. It’s fairly standard as far as lights go but packs more power than most shotgun lights. It’s not the smallest light and is a little heavy. The durability ratings might not make it ship to shore ready, but for bumps in the night, it can bump back.

Ergonomics, Controls, and More

The big problem with these shotgun forend lights is the weight. The longer the shotgun, the more noticeable it became. At 17.5 ounces, the Nightstick SFL is fairly heavy and will make a big 590A1 feel a little off balance. That’s not especially heavy for a shotgun forend light, but it’s not impressively light.

Close up of the SFL's tactile buttons.
The tactile buttons are a nice touch and provide ambidextrous controls.

Most of the light is made from high-impact polymer and features a fair degree of texture. This gives you a non-slip grip, but more importantly, it gives you leverage for that push/pull recoil mitigation technique. That no-slip grip makes it possible for me to really push forward on the pump to better control the gun.

The controls are a cross between the Streamlight TL Racker and the Surefire DSF. The Nightstick SFL comes equipped with an ambidextrous button system to control the light and laser. The buttons are big but not massive, and they are easy to engage. Nightstick positioned the buttons to be easy to reach with my pointer finger or thumb.

SFL tactical buttons are easy to avoid.
The buttons are easy to avoid if you don’t want alight ND.

If you want a tactile action, you get it with the Nightstick SFL. Those buttons are clicky and audible. You know when they get pressed. With the buttons, you can use a constant or momentary mode. A long press and then release gives you the momentary mode, and a short, single press turns it to constant. Simple and easy to remember and implement.

The Power!

Swapping between laser only, light only, and laser and light are easy and requires holding one button while pressing the other. In-person, that big bright light is impressive and capable. Indoors the light is huge and fills a room with bright white light that sits in the middle of the cool and warm spectrum. A bright white hot spot sits at the center that will cut through most normal photonic barriers.

The SFL illuminating the camera.
See the bad guy, shining a flashlight at me?

Indoors, you won’t have issues establishing positive identification with the Nightstick SLF. Outdoors the light works fairly well for shotgun ranges. It’s no Cloud Defensive OWL, but it’s damn sure bright enough to toss light out to 50 yards and fully illuminate a threat. Back to 100 yards, you can spot a person, but it might be tough to see if they are armed or not.

SFL light on target.
Well, mine beats his.

The light is certainly more tuned to close range with a wide beam than a super tightly focused one. That makes a lot of sense for a shotgun. Barrel shadow isn’t a huge issue because it’s mostly upwards and out of your normal cone of vision.

Laser It Up

My Nightstick SFL came with a green laser, and holy crap, is it big and bright. It’s an impressively capable beam. It’s also a ton of fun for blasting clays from the hip. Clays on a berm, not in the air. Most lasers get lost fairly easily in the bright sun of Florida, but this one can be seen from 25 yards away on a target in the sun.

The SFL is easy to manipulate.
Manipulating the SFL is quick and easy with minimal fuss. The SFL provides a solid grip for manipulations.

Sure, it takes some looking, but it can be seen. At super close range, a laser can act as a secondary aiming point, especially indoors. They make steering stockless shotguns on target a fair bit easier as well. The problem is that there is a fair bit of slop with a shotgun pump, especially on the Mossberg 500 series.

Zeroing it and having it move an inch from pump slop isn’t inspiring. I prefer a good red dot over a laser anyways. That being said, when combined with birdshot, it can be fun. Also, various models of the Nightstick SFL can be purchased without a laser to save a few bucks.

On the Range with the shotgun forend light

The shape and design of the Nightstick SFL lend themselves well to modern, action shooting. You can run the pump rapidly and easily without your hand slipping as you work the action. The non-slip grip keeps your hand in place as you run the gun and work the action.

The SFLs encourages good push and pull.
The texture encourages a good push/pull technique.

It’s easy to hold onto and launch all the buckshot, birdshot, and even slugs you could ever want. The Nightstick SFL provides shotgunner an affordable, easy handling, bright, and capable shotgun forend light. It doesn’t fail in being a pump or a weapon light. When it comes time for home defense, the Nightstick SFL offers you a mighty good option without costing Surefire money.

About the Author:

Travis Pike is a former Marine Machine Gunner, a lifelong firearms enthusiast, and now a regular guy who likes to shoot, write, and find ways to combine the two. He holds an NRA certification as a Basic Pistol Instructor. is the world’s Okayest firearm instructor, and a simplicisist when it comes to talking about himself in the 3rd person. Hit him up on Instagram, @travis.l.pike, with story ideas.

Author Travis pike

Faxon Firearms Rimfire: New 10/22 Barrels

Rimfire Barrels

Push Reliability and Accuracy to new heights with Ruger 10/22 barrels From Faxon Firearms. Faxon Firearms is proud to announce the availability of new rimfire barrels for the ever-iconic Ruger 10/22 rifle.

Why Should You Upgrade your Rimfire Barrels?

There is no doubt that the Ruger 10/22 is a good rifle out of the box with all factory components. Ruger has a reputation for building a dependable, durable, and accurate gun ready to shoot straight from the factory. Because of its popularity and reputation, the Ruger 10/22 has created one of any rifle’s largest aftermarket parts industries.

One of the top benefits of owning a Ruger 10/22 is that you can customize it without going broke. This alone makes the 10/22 rifle an excellent choice for those looking to tinker with their gun or get into the skill of gunsmithing.

With so many upgrades available, though, most owners overlook one of the essential components of their Ruger 10/22; the barrel. Ruger puts decent Rimfire barrels on their factory 10/22 rifles; however, If you want to enhance the accuracy and performance, you must consider upgrading the barrel.

 

The Ruger 10/22 with the barrel attached

Faxon believes that firearms bring people together and create generational memories. Faxon Firearms looks to expand on this legacy with the Faxon Rimfire line. Faxon Rimfire Barrels are made from 416-R stainless steel, given six groove rifling at a 1:16 twist, and a Recessed Target Crown. Barrels are Magnetic Particle Inspected and are finished in either Salt Bath Nitride or PVD. Both Tapered and Bull Barrel options are available.” – Faxon Firearms.

New “Shorty” 10/22 Rimfire Barrels (6.0″, 8.5″, and 10.5″)

The newest expansion of the Faxon Firearms Rimfire line includes three new short barrel offerings for the Ruger 10/22 platform. These new “shorty” barrels all have fluted designs and threaded muzzles and are made from 416R stainless steel.

These new 10/22 barrels are being manufactured alongside the other Faxon rimfire barrels in their Cincinnati facility. Like the additional barrels, they are manufactured from raw bar stock. In addition, they will undergo the same Magnetic Particle Inspection testing and quality assurance measures that all their rifle and pistol barrels go through.

Showcase of the barrels at an event

These three new Rimfire barrels will feature 6-groove rifling with a 1:16 barrel twist rate and recessed target crown and will be finished in either a Salt Bath Nitride or PVD coating. In addition, the 6″ and 10.5″ 10/22 barrels will come with the same straight fluting design.

The short 8.5″ 10/22 barrel will feature a Flame fluted design.

If you’re going to install any one of these barrels on a standard 10/22 receiver, you’ll need to go through the NFA registration process of applying for a tax stamp since it will be classified as an SBR.

Top of the Ruger 10/22

Faxon Rimfire Ruger 10/22 Barrel Specs

  • Barrel Caliber: .22 LR
  • Barrel Chamber: .22 LR Sporting
  • Barrel Profile: Flame Fluted
  • Barrel Material: 416-R Stainless
  • Barrel Weight: 1.0 to 1.4 lbs
  • Barrel Length: 16″
  • Barrel Twist: 1:16
  • Barrel Finish: Salt Bath Nitride
  • Rifling: 6 Groove
  • Target Crown: Recessed
  • Compatibility: 10/22, non-takedown

Rimfire Barrels

Rimfire Barrels

 

Faxon Rimfire Ruger 10/22 barrel’s weight savings.

  • Standard Factory Barrel: 1.78 lbs
  • Faxon Rimfire Pencil Barrels: 1.0 lbs
  • Faxon Rimfire Fluted Barrels: 1.4 lbs

The 10/22 may be an excellent rifle out of the box, but any one of these barrels will, without a doubt, maximize the performance even further.

Faxon Firearms has a barrel that can help you meet your goals when the time comes to take your rifle to the next level.

Learn more online at:

https://faxonfirearms.com/rimfire/rimfire-barrels/ or watch more about the barrels https://vimeo.com/539780252

The SIG P322 Review – Rimfire Perfection?

SIG P322 Review pistol

For a long time, SIG seemed stuck on the P320 and P365 as far as handguns go, so the release of the P322 was a pleasant surprise. They could have just released some quasi variant of the P320 or P365 but chose to go a different route. Going all original allows them to break from an established pistols design. In my SIG P322 review, I determined that the P322 can be many things and occupies a very versatile position in the world of handguns. 

SIG P322 Review pieces
These are all the goodies you get with the P322.

To me, it’s an excellent weapon for training. You can save some cash and train with .22 LR and have a gun that resembles and functions like a modern semi-auto handgun. The SIG P322 certainly looks and feels like a modern striker-fired handgun. It will be a fun plinker and a great way to introduce new shooters to firearms for others. To others, it might be a practical choice for the woods and dealing with pests or hunting small game. 

Everyone needs a good .22LR pistol, and the P322 offers you a thoroughly modern example at a reasonably low price. 

The P322 Under the Hood 

  • Barrel Length – 4 inches
  • Overall Length – 7 inches
  • Height – 5.5 inches
  • Width – 1.4 inches
  • Weight – 17.1 ounces

The specs show that the P322 swings into the realm of compact pistols like the P320C and Glock 19. It’s not tiny, but not large either. It’s that just-right size for many of us. My hand fits nicely on the grip, and I have plenty of room. My fingers aren’t stuffed together, and I can get that excellent high grip I want on a handgun. 

SIG P322 Review magazine
20 rounds in a flash-fitting magazine? Yes, please.

The SIG P322 comes with two 20-round magazines and a magazine load-assist device. It latches onto two little attachment points and helps you pull down the spring and follower for easy loading. Without the device loading, 20 rounds into the magazine get tiresome, and the device is a great addition. 

SIG P322 Review magazine loader
The magazine loader makes life oh so much easier.

We also got a curved trigger shoe and a flat trigger shoe. Then to round it all out, you get a thread adapter to make tossing on a can easy to do should you so choose. The gun has a Picatinny rail and is optics ready with a Shield RSMc footprint optic like the Holosun 507K. 

SIG P322 Review optic
The rear sight can be removed and replaced with an optic.

SIG used the tried and true straight blowback action for the P322. It makes a lot of sense for a little gun like this. The barrel remains fixed for increased accuracy, and the blowback design doesn’t have the typical downfalls for a .22LR. The weapon uses an internal SAO hammer to fire the gun. 

Tossing Lead 

SIG releasing the P322 at this time must mean they read my LiveJournal. I’ve been in the market for a more modern and traditional semi-auto .22LR. I was leaning heavily towards the FN 502 and Taurus TX22, but, for this SIG P322 review, the P322 slid in right under the wire and hit me with the features I wanted at a price point I wasn’t offended by. 

SIG P322 review firing
The P322 has no recoil to it.

With pricing only going up, I’ve invested heavily into .22 LR and I have a pile of various brands and figured running a few different brands would be the best way to test its reliability. So I fired Winchester bulk pack, Winchester Super-X, Federal AutoMatch, CCI Mini-Mag, Remington Golden Bullet, and Aguila Super Extra hollow points. 

SIG P322 on wood
The P322 is an easy shooting gun for all ages.

After a few magazines of each, the P322 proved it eats almost everything. My Remington ammo provided the most malfunctions, with six in three magazines. However, it should be noted this ammunition is pretty old and came out of the .22 LR drought we had years back. Everything else ran well without any noticeable problems beyond the occasional failure to fire. That’s relatively common with .22LR ammo. 

Ringing Steel 

For this SIG P322 review I am glad to announce that I want a gun that hits where I aim, and the SIG P322 does that well. The high visibility sights are exceptional and very easy to see and orient. SIG gives us a fully adjustable rear sight, and out of the box, mine was firing a little high. I made a minor adjustment, and bam, I was dead on. 

SIG P322 disassembled for review
It’s a fixed barrel, blowback design, and works exceptionally well.

The gun’s accurate, and the sights are incredible, but the trigger leaves something to be desired. The pull is quite stiff, and the trigger is spongy. Luckily the pull is short, and the reset is quick as well. It’s not a great trigger, but it’s good enough. 

SIG P322 review shooting stance
Optics ready, rail equipped, and with a 20-round magazine… it’s a tough-to-beat rimfire pistol.

At 10 yards, I ran a 10-10-10 drill in 6.38 seconds with every round in the black. At 15 yards, I ran my gong rack and went from large to small on a series of gongs. The smallest being 4 inches, the middle being 6 inches, and the largest being 8 inches. I scored all three hits in under 2.5 seconds. The lack of recoil makes it easy to achieve those fast follow-up shots. 

SIG P322 review firing
The P322 is incredibly reliable and easy to handle.

At 25 yards, I landed easy shots on the six and 8-inch gong, but the four proved problematic. It’s tough to see beyond the sights, but a red dot will fix that. So my first addition to this gun will be a red dot, likely a Holosun 407K. 

The SIG P322 In Hand 

The P322 feels excellent in hand and provides a solid experience ergonomically. The grip is right size-wise and has the same texture on the P365. The magazine release is a bit triangle like the P320 and reversible. The manual safety and slide lock/release gives right and lefties a choice when it comes time to go bang. 

SIG P322 pistol
It’s a compact-sized weapon in the size range of the Glock 19. Not too much to handle at all.

This is one of the few times my big thumbs don’t pin down the slide lock is with the P322. The slide locks back, placed a little further forward to accommodate the safety. That safety mounts to the frame and is easily activated or deactivated by the thumb. 

Firing the thing is an absolute joy. It doesn’t move. Recoil is nil as you’d expect, and it’s so much fun to shoot. After 50 rounds of 9mm, you’ll feel fatigued. After 500 rounds of 22LR, you’ll still feel fresh. Keeping it on target is super easy, making it a solid first gun or trainer for a new shooter. 

SIG P322 front sight
The sights are very nice and easy to see.

Drills like the failure to stop, box drill, and even the El Pres are easy. The two magazines mean you can practice those reloads, and I did just that. The SIG P322 has a built-in magwell that makes those mag swaps speedy. 

The .22 LR For All 

It is clear to see from my SIG P322 review that this gun gives the world a .22 LR pistol that everyone can use. It’s great for plinking, training, instructing, or competing in steel challenges. The little gun can do it all. In terms of holsters, SIG has one, but it also fits the Phalanx Defense Stealth Operator, so you have an affordable and available option. 

I think SIG has a real winner with the P322. It’s reliable, accurate, ergonomic, and a fair bit of fun. For 400 bucks, it’s a lot of gun.

About the Author:

Travis Pike is a former Marine Machine Gunner, a lifelong firearms enthusiast, and now a regular guy who likes to shoot, write, and find ways to combine the two. He holds an NRA certification as a Basic Pistol Instructor. is the world’s Okayest firearm instructor, and a simplicisist when it comes to talking about himself in the 3rd person. Hit him up on Instagram, @travis.l.pike, with story ideas.

Travis pike

New Fifty Shades of FDE Patch!

New Fifty Shades of FDE Patch!

If you’ve been following my social media feeds then you’ve seen my new patch that I had Patriot Patch Co make for me.

They came out great! As of right now, I have 30 left from the 100 I had for sale. If you would like to order one, please PayPal me $10 Friends & Family to [email protected] and Don’t forget to leave your mailing address in the notes.

I mail them first class USPS the same day or following day. They’re taking around a week or so to arrive and there is no tracking on envelopes. So give it a week or two to get to you.

Thank you for the support!

-Fifty

Maxim Defense MD-1505: An AR Take on the PDX

MD-1505

The PDX from Maxim Defense has proven to be an extraordinarily popular design over the last few years, but it has (understandably) never been on the lower end of the firearm price point scale. They have now launched the “MD-1505”, to make a more affordable AR-15 style PDX available. Though similar to the PDX in size and capability, the PDX has MILSPEC forged receivers and a different handguard. With the SCW stock, SCW brace, and SCW pistol system options, there should be a version available for most conceivable needs.

MD-1505

Here’s what Maxim had to say,

Maxim Defense MD-1505

When you’re looking for Maxim Defense PDX ingenuity in a standard AR-15 package, the MD-1505 is your answer. The MD-1505 was engineered to bring our top-tier PDX package to an even more affordable price point.

Starting at the muzzle, each MD-1505 is equipped with the patented Maxim HATEBRAKE muzzle device, which reduces recoil, decreases flash signature, pushes gasses, and concussion wave downrange away from the operator. All of which improve overall performance in short barrel pistols and rifles.

Maxim Defense Hatebrake
Zooming in on the Hate Brake muzzle booster (here on a different build, with some drum mag goodness).

For increased comfort and versatility every MD-1505 features our free-floating Slimline Handguard. These handguards provide a monolithic-like upper receiver platform and M-Slot compatibility on five sides. At the rear, the MD-1505S is equipped with our SCW Stock for the ultimate in compactness, comfort, and versatility.

FEATURES:

  • MOA accurate
  • Free-floating Maxim Slimline handguard
  • Military-grade materials
  • SCW compact stock
  • Increased reliability due to included HATEBRAKE
  • Optimized for low flash signature
  • Ambidextrous magazine release
  • Ambidextrous selector

MD-1505

SPECIFICATIONS:

  • CALIBERS 5.56 NATO, .300BLK, 7.62×39
  • BARREL LENGTH 5.5” / 139.7mm
  • MUZZLE VELOCITY 5.56 NATO, 62gr: 1965 FPS avg. .300 BLK, 115gr: 1850 FPS avg. 7.62×39, 124gr: 1675 FPS avg.
  • OVERALL LENGTH 18.75” / 476.25mm

MD-1505

MD-1505 Models

» MD-1505S «

» MD-1505SPB «

» MD-1505SPS «

MD-1505

MD-1505 Affordability

MD is well aware that “affordable” is an extremely subject term. Those who will immediately react negatively to the MSRP, know this: Maxim Defense has never sacrificed quality for a reduction in cost. Their description says more affordable, not “easily affordable” or any other permutation thereof. In the specific case of the MD-1505 vs. PDS, it is more affordable. That said, quality speaks for itself. The price point will not be for everyone.

Maxim Defense: Not built for safe queens. 

Learn more at www.maximdefense.com/

The XD-E 3.3 9mm from Springfield Armory

Springfield XD-E

[Guest author] Over the years, I’ve owned several of the Springfield Armory XD series of pistols. A few standard XDs, a few XDm versions, and an XD-S. One thing they all had in common was that through thousands of rounds (remember back when we could afford to shoot, back in the “Olden Days”?), I never experienced one single stoppage. Even the .40 Caliber XDm that I took to a shooting school right out of the box, never having lubed it, and proceeded to put 1,300 rounds through it in two days, the thing functioned perfectly. Not too long  back,  Springfield introduced another in the XD line, the XD-E (the “E” stands for external hammer). Here’s a rundown.

Springfield XDE 9mm

XDE 3.3 With External Hammer

by Jim Davis

So why in the world would anyone want an external hammer in this world of striker-fired pistols? Well, maybe that’s the point. Everything new these days seems to be striker-fired.

Not Quite A Pocket Pistol

The way I see it, the external hammer will appeal to a few segments of the shooting community. The “purists” cut their teeth on handguns that had exposed hammers. That crowd likes options, such as being able to carry “cocked and locked,” i.e., with the hammer cocked and a manual safety activated (which this pistol does allow).

That said, there is also a unique, new segment to our firearms community that is glaringly different: new shooters. They’ve arrived in droves, given the recent political developments. Finally, it has dawned on a massive segment of the American public that they may need to protect themselves in the very near future. They’ve finally concluded that seasoned shooters have long known, and that is that the government cannot protect us and that anarchists enjoy attacking people.

As a result, new shooters have joined the ranks like never before. I don’t know about you, but I think that maybe a pistol with an exposed hammer might be easier to learn on, and quite possibly, safer in the hands of a newer, less experienced shooter. An example is a revolver; when the hammer is cocked, it is evident that the revolver is ready to fire in single-action mode—the same situation with this pistol.

Springfield XD-E 9mm
The controls operated smoothly, including the takedown lever (far left), slide release, and safety/decocker. The safety is mounted slightly high for the author’s taste. Here, the XD-E is shown in “cocked and locked” mode.

XD-E 3.3 Specifications

At any rate, it’s time to take a look at the technical aspects of the XD-E. This particular model has a 3.3-inch barrel, which is hammer forged. The slide is forged steel with a Melonite finish, which is black. 

The pistol’s length is 6.75 inches, and the height is five inches. It is relatively thin overall, with the grip being one inch thick, contributing to its concealability. Make no mistake, though, this is not a tiny pocket pistol, by any stretch. Springfield classifies it as a “Compact,” which is reasonably accurate, as it’s smaller than a service pistol. The weight is 24.8 ounces with the nine-round magazine inserted.

The Magazine

There are two basic options of Springfield XD magazines available: eight or nine-round, both single stack. This contributes to the pistol’s thinness.

The eight-round magazine comes with a base plate with a finger rest, although a flush fit base plate does come with the pistol if the owner wishes to change that out.

The nine-round magazine comes with an extended floor plate, making the grip slightly longer, though not dramatically so. 

The magazines eject very nicely, in that when the release is pressed, they come shooting out! Magazines are constructed of stainless steel and are sturdily made. The XD-E will fire without a magazine inserted.

Springfield XD-E 9mm
A well-rounded carry package. XD-E, spare magazine, Federal Hydra-Shock Tactical ammunition, and a Strider SnG Tanto knife.

The Safety and Mag Release

A nice touch is that both the safety/decocker and the magazine release are ambidextrous. Not that they can be installed ambidextrously, but there is one on each side of the pistol! Southpaws will like that, and it’s handy for when a shooter is using his weak side. 

The safety/decocker works well but is mounted slightly high for my taste in that I have to adjust my grip to take the weapon off safe. Not a lot, but enough that it’s not at optimal efficiency for me. On the other hand, my wife wasn’t bothered by this in the least, and it worked great for her. If I had my way, it would be mounted lower in the fashion of the 1911. Being able to carry cocked and locked (that is, with a round in the chamber, hammer back, safety on) is a nice option. Others will prefer carrying with the hammer down and having the choice of the safety on or off. 

A loaded chamber indicator is on the top of the slide just behind the breach block that sticks up when a round is in the chamber.

A dual captive spring with a total length guide rod is used in the recoil system, and it does a nice job taming recoil.

The Sights

The sights on the pistol are very nicely done, consisting of a three-dot configuration that is pretty standard these days. The front sight is a red fiber optic that takes the sights to the next level into the highly effective category. The fact that the sights are steel is also a plus. All in all, high marks in this department!

The bore axis on the XD-E is relatively high, unlike many other pistols on the market these days. I prefer a lower bore axis, but this didn’t prove detrimental in actual shooting.

The Trigger

The double-action trigger pull is long and incredibly smooth, stacking at the end, just before the break. The smoothness of the pull is surprising. There is a pleasingly short trigger reset, which will allow quick follow-up shots. The single-action trigger has some takeup before it breaks but is not excessive. Overall, it’s a decent trigger. I wish that my trigger finger was a fraction of an inch longer because the bottom corner of the trigger grabs the edge of my trigger finger.

The Grip

An essential part of any pistol is the grip, and the XD-E will fit a wide range of shooters in this aspect. My hands are on the smaller side, and I found the slim group to fill my hand well. However, shooters with larger hands will probably like that; although the grip is thin, it is also wide enough to accommodate their bear paws comfortably. Springfield was rather ingenious in how they managed to construct a grip that would appeal to so many shooters. 

The grip texture is rough enough that it seems to offer a positive purchase and yet not be so abrasive as to chafe the skin when carrying the pistol concealed. It seems they’ve arrived at a sensible compromise here.

Stripping the XD-E

Field stripping is accomplished in the same fashion as most pistols on today’s market; the slide is retracted and locked to the rear, the takedown lever is flipped up. From there, the slide is removed, and then the recoil spring and barrel can be taken out. Reassembly is in the reverse order. It all goes very smoothly with no hidden surprises. 

 

Springfield XD-E 9mm
Field stripped, the XD-E disassembles just like most other pistols on the market. Note the double captive recoil spring.

When the pistol is stripped down, the quality of construction that we’ve come to expect from Springfield Armory is in evidence, with no tool marks being apparent. The pistol works very smoothly overall.

Range Time with XD-E

We hit the range with the XD-E on a rare warm day to see how it would fare. I started at 25 yards resting the pistol on a bench to test the accuracy. Well, I won’t post a photo of that group because…I was getting used to the gun! Yes, I’m sure that was the case!

During rapid-fire, it was easy to keep hits inside the target. Headshots from 25 yards were no problem.

After my first dismal group, though, it came into its own. No, it wasn’t shooting one-inch groups at 25 yards. Still, it kept everything nicely centered on a man-sized target at a remarkably rapid rate of fire. Headshots were also possible at 25 yards. I didn’t shoot beyond 25 yards, but I’m sure it would perform admirably well past that range.

I did some drills transitioning from double action to single action. It felt pretty much like every other DA/SA handgun I’ve ever fired, except that the XD-E’s DA (Double Action) pull is smooth as glass. Of course, single firing action was easier and increased accuracy.

The Recoil

The recoil was pleasantly moderate (not light, but far from heavy). The grip offers enough area that the shooter has an excellent surface to grasp, which spreads out the recoil impulse. However, it was not snappy, and the sights settled right back to the target after each shot. As a result, rapid-fire drills with the pistol were easy to accomplish; you can quickly put a lot of lead on target with this pistol. 

Rapid-fire drills on bad guy targets. Recoil was quite manageable, with sights returning quickly to the target.

The pistol points quickly, and the sights seem to come onto target naturally to make matters better. That fiber-optic, glowing red sight makes acquiring the sights a no-brainer, and these are easily among the best sights that I’ve ever used in a pistol.

Reliability and Comfort

Reliability was impressive because I put some of the lowest quality ammo that I have ever used through it (“Perfecto” brand, bought at Walmart a few years back for $5/box). Perfecto sometimes has light-charged rounds and is just the junkiest stuff I’ve ever used. However, the XD-E ran through it perfectly, as well as the higher quality ammo that I fed it. So rest easy that this is a reliable handgun.

My daughter tried her hand with the XD-E and gave it high marks; she also thought very highly of the sights. Aside from that, one other aspect of the pistol is enamored here: it is easy to rack the slide. She has a disability with her left hand, and even with that, she could retract the slide to chamber a round. This might be an essential consideration for those who don’t have a lot of arm or hand strength and those who are…ahem…aging. Arthritis in the hands, wrists, and arms can do a number on our strength, and having a pistol that is friendly to our impediments can mean a lot.

Springfield XD-E 9mm
Putting the pistol through its paces. It handled very well! Smooth, accurate, and fast.

Post Range Time with the 3.3 XDE 9mm

The XD-E does have an accessory rail on the dust cover for those who wish to mount lights, lasers, and other accessories. It is a standard Picatinny rail. 

I’ll be honest; I was lukewarm toward the XD-E when I first unboxed it. In my book, it’s not an exciting pistol for me to look at, sort of a “plain vanilla” pistol. But after getting it to the range and putting rounds on target, my excitement for the XD-E tripled. It’s accurate, 100% reliable, smooth, fast, and user-friendly.

All controls functioned as they should, including the slide release. Usually, I don’t use slide releases because they demand fine motor skills, which we lose when adrenaline affects us. As such, I typically rack the slide using my hand, which utilizes gross motor skills. Those slide releases on many pistols, especially new ones, can be very stiff and difficult to operate. Not so with the XD-E; it was easy to manipulate and large enough to do so comfortably. All controls on the XD-E were smooth and easy to operate; they get a 100% from me.

The XD-E’s MSRP

At the time of this writing, the retail of the pistol is $542, so it will be available for considerably less from suppliers. Nevertheless, Springfield Armory has certainly priced this one reasonably, especially compared to some offerings from other manufacturers.

In summary, the XD-E is a winner; given its ease of use, accuracy, reliability, and comfort, it is a solid choice for defensive carry. I would feel comfortable carrying it for defense. 

 

About the Autor: Jim Davis served in the PA Dept. of Corrections for 16 ½ years as a corrections officer in the State Correctional Institute at Graterford and later at SCI Phoenix. He served on the Corrections Emergency Response Team (CERT), several of those years as a sniper, and also the Fire Emergency Response Team (FERT). For 25 years, he was a professional instructor, teaching topics including Defensive Tactics, Riot Control and Tactical Operations, Immediate Responder, and cognitive programs as an adjunct instructor at the DOC Training Academy. He was then promoted to the title of corrections counselor, where he ran a caseload and facilitated cognitive therapy classes to inmates. His total service time was close to 29 years. He was involved in many violent encounters on duty, including incidents of fatalities.