Mike-102: an AK-AR-HK Hybrid?

Mike-102: an AK-AR-HK Hybrid?

One of the more interesting rifle-related things unveiled at SHOT Show 2023 was also one of the most interesting Foxtrot Mike products available yet: an AK AR hybrid called the Mike-102. The Foxtrot Mike Mike-102 is a hybrid AR 15 and AK 47 rifle with some HK influences forged in. That may or may not appeal to some folks, but you can bet it will to many others.

Why? Because we can. ‘Merica.

Foxtrot Mike Products: the Mike-102

AK AR HK Hybrid?

The FM Mike-102 is an AR15 platform chambered in .223 Wylde that feeds from AK magazines. It utilizes the Foxtrot Mike compact DI system, features a folding stock, and sports an HK-style forward charging handle.

This is an intriguing combination that provides AR handling, the use of rock-and-lock AK mags, and the option of using the “HK slap” to drop the bolt.

Maybe we’re shallow, but we like that.

Here are some other FM Mike-102 things to know:

 Production testing was at least partially conducted during KalashBash and Red Oktober.

 It’s a bufferless system (i.e., no buffer nor no buffer tube).

 Some have a non-reciprocating side charging handle; others have the “slap mod”.

 The “slap mod variant” echoes HK charging handles.

 You can lock the bolt to the rear.

 It takes AK102 compatible magazines in 5.56×45

 Will be available in sizes ranging from a 9-inch pistol all the way up to a 16-inch rifle.

 A 13.9 pin and weld model will be inbound soon.

 So will a 7.62x39mm version.

MK-102 Diagram
Via Atlantic Firearms

Foxtrot Mike describes the Mike-102 as a “…modern AK-Hybrid, designed for the modern shooter to use a wide variety of  AK 5.56/223 magazines and offer the familiar Rock N Lock magwell.  The 102 is lightweight, accurate, and modular, much like an AR-15, but with the added benefit of using most AK  magazines. It uses a simple direct impingement operating system that is simple and reliable.”

Learn more about Foxtrot Mike’s AK AR Hybrid.

Read this article in its entirety at Rainier Arms.

Revision and Fast Metal Join Forces for The Speed Demon Sunglasses

man holding a rifle and wearing Speed Demon glasses

Two industry giants have come together to create something truly special. Revision Military, a leading producer of protective eyewear, has spent years developing best-in-class ballistic protective lenses. At the same time, Fast Metal and its founder have been working on premium made-in-USA aluminum sunglasses. And now, they’re ready to reveal their latest collaboration to the world. Let’s turn to the official press release to see what the companies have to announce.

Making a Perfect Pair

Revision Military, a leading producer of protective eyewear, has spent years developing best-in-class ballistic protective lenses. Similarly, Fast Metal and its founder have spent that time developing premium made-in-USA aluminum sunglasses. With this collaboration announcement, the two companies have combined what they are truly experts in to create the Revision Speed Demon metal sunglasses with Revision’s new I-Vis lens technology. These sunglasses bring together state-of-the-art lens technology with a sleek, stylish frame.

Fast Metal was built on over 35 years of experience in manufacturing the highest quality metal sunglasses by its founder, Ken Wilson. As the pioneer of the aluminum sunglass industry, Ken created the first patented 27-step procedure for manufacturing high-quality aluminum frames. Today, Fast Metal is proud to offer the world’s first and best aluminum sunglass and eyewear protection system featuring field-replaceable lenses.

Photo example of Revision's I-Vis Technology
This is an example of the I-Vis Technology and not the Speed Demon frames

Revision’s History

Over the past 20 years, Revision has become the proven supplier of military protective eyewear to NATO forces worldwide. This new partnership with Fast Metal is a powerful relationship combining military and tactical industry expertise with the best aluminum sunglass design. The goal – is to create an eyewear protection system that customers not only need but want.

“At Revision, we believe in the power of partnerships and collaborations in bringing new and exciting technology to end-users quickly,” said Revision CEO Amy Coyne. “Our new I-Vis lens technology delivers enhanced visual performance, and we needed an everyday sunglass platform to offer protection, style, and performance. We believe this collab is just the beginning of our partnership with Ken and the Fast Metal team.”

Man Aiming a rifle and wearing Revision's glasses outside

Speed Demon Specs

So what’s so special about these new Revision Speed Demon Sunglasses?

Well, first, the frame is entirely made out of aluminum 7075 allow, which provides ANSI Z87.1 protection.

Product photo of the Speed Demon glasses and their hard and soft cases

Second, it is available with Revision’s new I-Vis lens technology. This technology is an advanced dye formulation process resulting in a new series of lens tints that markedly enhance visual performance. More than a single solution, I-Vis lenses are available in six tints, each optimized for use in a different environment. Each tint is designed to increase contrast and elevate color recognition in specific geographic regions, doing so without the negative effects associated with traditional monochromatic lens tints. These Speed Demon lenses also come with Revision’s OcuMax anti-fog and scratch coating and are field replaceable.

Finally, all frames and lenses are made in the USA; frames are made by Fast Metal in Yuma, Arizona, and lenses are made by Revision in Essex Junction, Vermont. The product is available for sale today at www.revisionmilitary.com and coming soon to Revision’s network of dealers and distributors around the globe.

Revision sunglasses sitting in a dead tree

Final Rule ATF 2021-05F: The BATFE on 80% Frames

Final Rule ATF 2021-05F: The BATFE on 80% Frames

FINAL RULE ATF: Last week, the BATFE issued new guidance on the legality of 80% frame lowers like those manufactured by Polymer 80, Lone Wolf Arms, Nomad Defense, and Matrix Arms. It’s rarely a Good Thing when we have to report ATF news, and this time is no different.

ATF Changes its Mind. Again.

Once again, the Federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF) has changed its mind. Remember how 80 percent frames and lowers were legal until Joe Biden’s ATF decided that they weren’t? You know, like the ATF always does.

That question was shaking out as part of the Vanderstok v. Garland case in federal court, with the ATF agreeing that the frames and receivers in question were indeed legal so long as they didn’t ship with “associated templates, jigs, molds, equipment, tools, instructions, guides, or marketing materials.”

So, basically, the frames and receivers are only firearms under the Gun Control Act (GCA) if they are packaged with those “non-firearm objects” (NFO). Strange, but okay. Companies had already incorporated that change and were continuing to ship their products. NFO sold separately.

Then, out of the blue, ATF dropped a new rule on FFLs by way of a December 27 open letter. The letter stated that “these partially complete pistol frames are ‘frames’ and ‘firearms’ as defined in the GCA and its implementing regulations.” Even if they don’t include the NFO items.

ATF bases this change on the definition of the word “readily,” as in whether these frames can be “readily converted” to fully functioning firearms.

ATF open letter on GLock 80 frames

Here’s an excerpt from that statement:

Applying the regulatory text of Final Rule 2021-05F, partially complete Polymer80, Lone Wolf, and similar striker-fired semiautomatic pistol frames, including, but not limited to, those sold within parts kits, have reached a stage of manufacture where they “may readily be completed, assembled, restored, or otherwise converted” to a functional frame. This definition of “readily” applies to each and every classification of a partially complete frame or receiver under this Rule, whether sold alone or as part of a kit. Therefore, even without any associated templates, jigs, molds, equipment, tools, instructions, guides, or marketing materials, these partially complete pistol frames are “frames” and also “firearms” as defined in the GCA and its implementing regulations, 18 U.S.C. § 921(a)(3)(B) and 27 CFR 478.12(a)(1), (c).

The following are some examples of companies that build 80% frames.

•  Polymer 80 

• Nomad Defense

•  Matrix Arms

•  Lone Wolf Arms

Now learn about the sizes of handguns!